A Walk Through ‘CB’ Time – Ancient Calendars

The Celestial Body (‘CB’) — the Sun, a Moon, a planet, and stars — have provided us a reference for measuring the passage of time throughout our existence. Ancient civilizations relied upon the apparent motion of these bodies through the sky to determine seasons, months, and years.

fall-back2We know little about the details of timekeeping in prehistoric eras, but wherever we turn up records and artifacts, we usually discover that in every culture, some people were preoccupied with measuring and recording the passage of time. Ice-age hunters in Europe over 20,000 years ago scratched lines and gouged holes in sticks and bones, possibly counting the days between phases of the moon. Five thousand years ago, Sumerians in the Tigris-Euphrates valley in today’s Iraq had a calendar that divided the year into 30 day months, divided the day into 12 periods (each corresponding to 2 of our hours), and divided these periods into 30 parts (each like 4 of our minutes). We have no written records of Stonehenge, built over 4000 years ago in England, but its alignments show its purposes apparently included the determination of seasonal or celestial events, such as lunar eclipses, solstices and so on.

The earliest Egyptian calendar was based on the moon’s cycles, but later the Egyptians realized that the “Dog Star” in Canis Major, which we call Sirius, rose next to the sun every 365 days, about when the annual inundation of the Nile began. Based on this knowledge, they devised a 365 day calendar that seems to have begun around 3100 BCE (Before the Common Era), which thus seems to be one of the earliest years recorded in history.

NIST article originally presented November 6, 2016 via bdpatoday.

— Source: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

2019 Tech & Community Awards Reception

Delta Outage may have been Self-Inflicted

ATLANTA—The airline had cancelled more than 650 flights by 5:00 PM EDT as of Monday, August 8, 2016.  Just days before National BDPA’s Technology Conference in Atlanta, the outage triggered massive delays world wide.

Mashable reports Delta’s so-called power outage likely occurred in an unconventional manner.   Georgia Power, regional provider of electricity to millions of customers in Georgia where Delta’s headquarters is located, reported no outages. Mashable also reports aviation experts observed the outage occurred in the early hours of the morning during off-peak travel times in CONUS, normal times to conduct tests.

The likely cause may have been normally scheduled “back-up” power tests that went south very fast when switching from primary to alternative power sources and back.  This did not occur properly and Delta’s main power to computer systems were not restored in a timely manner. Delta’s check-in systems remained offline and associated mobile apps subsequently failed.

Could this week’s outage be classified a “cyber” event?  Are continuity of operations and disaster recovery plans (CoOP/DR) thoroughly tested?   Read more

Source: Mashable.com
Photo courtesy: Delta Air Lines, Inc.

____________________
For additional information  and updates from this week’s National BDPA Technology Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, visit: BDPA.org or follow  bdpatoday on Twitter.

Washington D.C. Commission Approves Exelon’s Merger with Pepco

$7 Billion deal creates the nation’s top power distributor

WASHINGTON—Washington D.C. regulators on Wednesday, March 23, 2016, approved power company Exelon Corporation‘s merger with Pepco Holdings Inc., a decision that clears the last regulatory hurdle facing the $6.8 billion deal to create the country’s top power distributor.

pepco-exelonThe D.C. Public Service Commission, which regulates power, gas and telecommunication companies in the District of Columbia, voted to approve the merger, a commission spokeswoman said. The vote was 2 to 1.

Pepco’s shares rose 28 percent, or $5.92, to $27.16 while Exelon’s shares were largely unchanged.

Read more

Sources: CNBC and Reuters    Image courtesy: WMAL
%d bloggers like this: