Exascale Day with BDPA!

It’s October 18th 2021.  Happy Exascale day!

WASHINGTON—As we enter a new era in research and development (R&D) or modeling and simulation, exascale computing will rapidly transform our abilities to do just about anything with any connected or remote device on, in, or near our planet. 

Exascale systems and supercomputers are able to achieve over 1 quintillion operations per second. That’s 10 to the 18th power (10^18), or a “1” followed by 18 zeros. On National Exascale Day,  National BDPA, local BDPA Chapters, bdpatoday, and PTTV  celebrate  our 10th month on its 18th day.

Our Exascale Era will have very profound impacts on all industry market segments from energy, health,  manufacturing, logistics, and supply chain management to all modes of transportation, infrastructure, new technologies and policy.

So how will these advanced technologies all work together with our village and in your ‘hood?  How could more data from satellites, sensors, devices, and people, really work well atop newly secured platforms with compute at the edge in our new era?  

To view what a few Industry insiders have to say, visit our Exascale Day playlist and check out https://www.000000000000000000.com/ from HPE, one of National BDPA’s mission partners and longtime High School Computer Competition (HSCC) coding sponsor.

Sources: HPE and bdpatoday


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2020 Census Data is Out, Apportionment Results Delivered to the President

WASHINGTON—The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that the 2020 Census shows the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2020, was 331,449,281.

The U.S. resident population represents the total number of people living in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The resident population increased by 22,703,743 or 7.4% from 308,745,538 in 2010.

“The American public deserves a big thank you for its overwhelming response to the 2020 Census,” Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo said. “Despite many challenges, our nation completed a census for the 24th time. This act is fundamental to our democracy and a declaration of our growth and resilience. I also want to thank the team at the U.S. Census Bureau, who overcame unprecedented challenges to collect and produce high-quality data that will inform decision-making for years to come.”

“We are proud to release these first results from the 2020 Census today. These results reflect the tireless commitment from the entire Census Bureau team to produce the highest-quality statistics that will continue to shape the future of our country,” acting Census Bureau Director Ron Jarmin said. “And in a first for the Census Bureau, we are releasing data quality metrics on the same day we’re making the resident population counts available to the public. We are confident that today’s 2020 Census results meet our high data quality standards.” 

The new resident population statistics for the United States, each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are available on census.gov

  • The most populous state was California (39,538,223); the least populous was Wyoming (576,851).
  • The state that gained the most numerically since the 2010 Census was Texas (up 3,999,944 to 29,145,505).
  • The fastest-growing state since the 2010 Census was Utah (up 18.4% to 3,271,616).
  • Puerto Rico’s resident population was 3,285,874, down 11.8% from 3,725,789 in the 2010 Census.

In addition to these newly released statistics, today Secretary Raimondo delivered to President Biden the population counts to be used for apportioning the seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. In accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code, a congressionally defined formula is applied to the apportionment population to distribute the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives among the states.

The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them overseas who could be allocated to a home state. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population because they do not have voting seats in Congress. The counts of overseas federal employees (and their dependents) are used for apportionment purposes only.

  • After the 1790 Census, each member of the House represented about 34,000 residents. Since then, the House has more than quadrupled in size (from 105 to 435 seats), and each member will represent an average of 761,169 people based on the 2020 Census.
  • Texas will gain two seats in the House of Representatives, five states will gain one seat each (Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina, and Oregon), seven states will lose one seat each (California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), and the remaining states’ number of seats will not change based on the 2020 Census. 

Upon receipt of the apportionment counts, the president will transmit them to the 117th Congress. The reapportioned Congress will be the 118th, which convenes in January 2023.

“Our work doesn’t stop here,” added acting Director Jarmin. “Now that the apportionment counts are delivered, we will begin the additional activities needed to create and deliver the redistricting data that were previously delayed due to COVID-19.”

Redistricting data include the local area counts states need to redraw or “redistrict” legislative boundaries. Due to modifications to processing activities, COVID-19 data collections delays, and the Census Bureau’s obligation to provide high-quality data, states are expected to receive redistricting data by August 16, and the full redistricting data with toolkits for ease of use will be delivered by September 30. The Census Bureau will notify the public prior to releasing the data.

Source: U.S. Census

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Visit bdpa.org for registration and sponsorship opportunities

HPE, JEF, and BDPA Commemorate “Exascale Day” ― 10^18

Webinar + APBi: 17 OCT 20 10:00 am ET

Link to recorded webinar (October 17, 2020):
View webinar → https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptj2yiciZiU&list=PLwwkfkXZ4yRqAiMIDUYDxJ3GQWruLPwwa

Industry Presenter: Steve Heibein
Steve Heibein is the Artificial Intelligence (Ai) Lead for Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Before HPE, he served as CIO, CTO, or VP Engineering for 20 years at several tech and media companies. In these roles, he oversaw Ai, machine learning, and data analytics projects in the areas of life science, fraud prevention, natural language processing, identity theft, cybersecurity, and energy forecasting. Steve advises organizations on the use and deployment of Ai solutions and regularly presents about high-performance computing and artificial intelligence.

Industry Moderator/Co-Host: Bryan Bemley
Bryan Bemley is an IT security specialist with Accenture Federal Services (AFS) and CIO of Joint Educational Facilities (JEF), Inc. Since the age of four, Bryan has always been fascinated with technology, beginning his leap with learning and understand DOS. Since then, Bryan has immersed himself in many different areas in Computer Science and Information Technology including Artificial Life, High Performance Computing (HPC), Web and Graphic Design, Cloud Computing, and Cyber Security. Using his experience and love of research and technology, Bryan strives to teach and mentor anyone who has an interest in IT to increase their body of knowledge.

Summary: Exascale Day is 18 October 2020
Exascale Day is the day we celebrate people and organizations actively using supercomputing and computational science to change the world for the better.

WEBINAR: Since 1982, HP, HPE, and Joint Educational Facilities, Inc. (JEF) have been Industry mission-partners with National BDPA and the High Performance Computing (HPC) Community. In this webinar and advance planning briefing for Interns and Industry (APBi) series, we highlight “Artificial Intelligence” or “Ai” along with, HPE, our HPC Community, and achievements across Industry featuring BDPA and JEF collaborations and related success stories. Our question and answer (Q&A) segment is facilitated by Bryan Bemley (JEF.org) and Perry Carter (bdpatoday.com).

Up next with JEF and BDPA: Autonomous Operations: Ai and Compute at “The Edge” and “Edge-to-Core Analytics” (our next sessions featuring HPE are November 7th and 14th).

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Joint Educational Facilities, Inc. • High Performance Computing (HPC) in the Community • JEF.org

It’s Not a Pipeline Problem

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — Your company struggles with finding diverse talent; it’s not a pipeline problem. It’s a buy-in, bias, branding and business case problem. Unconscious bias is like an odorless gas; it affects everyone, everywhere all the time. It is not a problem humans can solve without augmented intelligence.  Blendoor tackles bias with great design, artificial intelligence (AI), deep learning, and people analytics.

blendoor2Blendoor has deep expertise in enterprise software as a service (SaaS), diversity and inclusion (D&I), machine learning (ML), and a passion for creating technology that makes an impact.  The company aggregates diverse talent from multiple sources to broaden talent search and then uses blind review and analytics to mitigate unconscious bias ‘from source to hire.’

Today, Blendoor is revolutionizing the way people see people. They understand the significant impact of unconscious bias in our day-to-day world and for them, hiring is just the tip of the iceberg. The America of today and tomorrow is very different than it was at the turn of the century. Demographics are rapidly changing and so are priorities. People want to know that they are represented and the companies they work for are both progressive and inclusive spaces.

Though we know the term diversity can be interpreted in several ways,  Blendoor focused specifically on diversity of gender, race, ability, and sexual orientation when aggregating data for its latest product, BlendScore. Companies were scored and ranked based on their respective diversity and inclusion efforts to help job-seekers find where they truly belong. Discover more at blendoor.com.

— Source and photos: Blendoor

 

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Two young women using a laptop in a cafe

NOAA predicts near-normal 2019 Atlantic hurricane season

Silver Spring, MD—NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is predicting that a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season is most likely this year. This outlook forecasts a 40% chance of a near-normal season, a 30% chance of an above-normal season and a 30% chance of a below-normal season. The hurricane season officially extends from June 1st to November 30th.

For 2019, NOAA predicts a likely range of 9 to 15 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 4 to 8 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes.

A graphic showing hurricane season probability and numbers of named storms.

“With the 2019 hurricane season upon us, NOAA is leveraging cutting-edge tools to help secure Americans against the threat posed by hurricanes and tropical cyclones across both the Atlantic and Pacific,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “Throughout hurricane season, dedicated NOAA staff will remain on alert for any danger to American lives and communities.”

This outlook reflects competing climate factors. The ongoing El Nino is expected to persist and suppress the intensity of the hurricane season. Countering El Nino is the expected combination of warmer-than-average sea-surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, and an enhanced west African monsoon, both of which favor increased hurricane activity.

“New satellite data and other upgrades to products and services from NOAA enable a more Weather-Ready Nation by providing the public and decision makers with the information needed to take action before, during, and after a hurricane,” said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., acting NOAA administrator.

The 2019 hurricane season marks the first time NOAA’s fleet of Earth-observing satellites includes three operational next-generation satellites. Unique and valuable data from these satellites feed the hurricane forecast models used by forecasters to help users make critical decisions days in advance

NOAA’s National Weather Service is making a planned upgrade to its Global Forecast System (GFS) flagship weather model – often called the American model – early in the 2019 hurricane season. This marks the first major upgrade to the dynamical core of the model in almost 40 years and will improve tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts. “NOAA is driving towards a community-based development program for future weather and climate modeling to deliver the very best forecasts, by leveraging new investments in research and working with the weather enterprise,” added Jacobs.

NOAA’s National Hurricane Center and NWS office in San Juan will expand the coastal storm surge watches and warnings in 2019 to include Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In addition, NHC will display excessive rainfall outlooks on its website, providing greater visibility of one of the most dangerous inland threats from hurricanes.

Also, this season, NOAA’s Hurricane Hunter aircraft will collect higher-resolution data from upgraded onboard radar systems. These enhanced observations will be transmitted in near-real time to hurricane specialists at the National Hurricane Center, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center and forecasters at NWS Weather Forecast Offices.

A graphic showing 2019 Atlantic tropical cyclone names selected by the World Meteorological Organization.

In addition to the Atlantic hurricane season outlook, NOAA also issued seasonal hurricane outlooks for the eastern and central Pacific basins. A 70% chance of an above-normal season is predicted for both the eastern and central Pacific regions. The eastern Pacific outlook calls for a 70% probability of 15 to 22 named storms, of which 8 to 13 are expected to become hurricanes, including 4 to 8 major hurricanes. The central Pacific outlook calls for a 70% probability of 5 to 8 tropical cyclones, which includes tropical depressions, tropical storms, and hurricanes.

NOAA’s outlook is for overall seasonal activity and is not a landfall forecast. Hurricane preparedness is critically important for the 2019 hurricane season, just as it is every year. Visit the National Hurricane Center’s website at hurricanes.gov throughout the season to stay current on any watches and warnings.

“Preparing ahead of a disaster is the responsibility of all levels of government, the private sector, and the public,” said Daniel Kaniewski, Ph.D., FEMA deputy administrator for resilience. “It only takes one event to devastate a community so now is the time to prepare. Do you have cash on hand? Do you have adequate insurance, including flood insurance? Does your family have communication and evacuation plans? Stay tuned to your local news and download the FEMA app to get alerts, and make sure you heed any warnings issued by local officials.”

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center will update the 2019 Atlantic seasonal outlook in August just prior to the historical peak of the season.

Source: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Top photo: bdpatoday

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