NOAA’s Global Systems Laboratory Welcomes Dr. DaNa Carlis As New Deputy Director

BOULDER, CO — DaNa L. Carlis, Ph.D., joined GSL as the Deputy Director in September 2020. He comes to GSL from the NOAA Weather Program Office (WPO), where he established the Earth Prediction Innovation Center (EPIC) Program. DaNa enjoys working between science, policy, and society to ensure better products and services for the American people. He is also passionate about leadership, diversity, and inclusion, and mentoring the next generation of scientists.

“I couldn’t be more grateful and excited to join GSL because of its focus on applied research and development, advanced technologies, and transitioning and improving research-to-operations with the National Weather Service (NWS). GSL aligns perfectly with my desire to provide better products and services to the American people. I’ve always wanted to do research that impacts people’s lives, and GSL is a premier NOAA research laboratory that provides innovative tools and services that lead to better decisions and ultimately save lives,” said Carlis. “As the GSL’s Deputy Director, I am committed to bringing strong leadership and listening skills along with a creative mind to continue to advance the GSL mission. In addition, I plan to continue to uphold GSL’s scientific prowess, which is displayed in our cutting-edge research portfolio that is widely recognized by the Weather Enterprise.”

DaNa attended Howard University in Washington, DC, and earned his B.S. degree in Chemistry (1999), and an M.S. (2002) and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science (2007) as a graduate student of the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science and Meteorology (NCAS-M). In 2002, DaNa accepted a fellowship from the NOAA Office of Education Educational Partnership Program (EPP) as a member of the Graduate Sciences Program and completed his M.S thesis research at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) conducting an analysis of SO2 cross-sections for the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite. He completed his Ph.D. dissertation on the beautiful island of Oahu, Hawaii, titled “Numerical Simulations of Island-Scale Airflow and the Maui Vortex Under Summer Trade-wind Conditions.” DaNa was the second male to receive a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences since Howard’s inception in 1867.

Dr. DaNa Carlis

DaNa credits NCAS-M and NOAA’s Educational Partnership Program/Minority-Serving Institution EPP/MSI Program for allowing him to pursue what he loves and providing a pathway to federal employment. DaNa has held positions at the NWS National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) as a research meteorologist working on NOAA’s Global Forecast System (GFS) Model (2007-2014), and as a policy advisor to NOAA’s Chief Scientist and NOAA’s Assistant Secretary of Environmental Observations and Prediction (2014-2016). DaNa is a graduate of NOAA’s Leadership Competency Development Program (LCDP) Class IX where he learned a great leadership lesson that’s been his mantra for the last few years and that’s to work in an environment where he’s comfortably uncomfortable.

DaNa is originally from Tulsa, OK. In his spare time, he enjoys cheering for his favorite sports team, the Oklahoma Sooners, mentoring boys from underrepresented communities that come from single-parent households, and traveling the world with his family. In 2016, he wrote a children’s book titled “MIT: Meteorologist in Training” and he’s published peer-reviewed papers. DaNa is married to Dr. Lydia Carlis, and they have a daughter, Dia Dannielle, who is a senior at Georgia State University. — bt

Source and photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Cover photo (above): Dr. DaNa Carlis keynotes BDPA’s 2019 annual Regional Earth Day Tech Summit
with Jr. Devs (coders and developers) and Regional High School Coding Competition (HSCC) finalists

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Tablets For Teens | tabletsforteens.org

Teachers: Ready for a new school year with NOAA

WASHINGTON, D.C. — For the new school year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  welcomes teachers and students back to school this fall. For those interested in bringing more science and data into our classrooms, the following lists exciting science and technical resource highlights featuring planet Earth.

Do more with data
NOAA is an incredible source for getting started with earth science data. In fact, we have an entire collection of data resources just for educators. If it’s your first time teaching with data, check out our classroom-ready data resources, which are all ready to go. Then dive into some of our best primary data sources from paleoclimatology to real-time ocean conditions.

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Download the new NOAA Science on a Sphere Explorer mobile app and bring beautiful visualizations of global data into the palm of your hand. Use the National Data Buoy Center to monitor water quality across the ocean. See potential flooding impacts across most of the United States and its territories with the Sea Level Rise Viewer. Become a Climate Exploreroffsite link while looking over historical and projected climate data.

Investigate the International Year of the Salmon
Did you know that 2019 is the International Year of the Salmon? Bring salmon education into your classroom with lessons and activities from our West Coast Fisheries office. Discover salmon species that are managed by NOAA Fisheries, including the three populations that NOAA scientists consider highly at-risk of extinction.

Clue into clouds
Check out the newly updated NOAA cloud chart. Learn to identify the clouds you see overhead and delve into new information about understanding the weather. Then try analyzing your own weather with JetStream and reading a weather map with SciJinks.

Become citizen scientists
Connect your students to ongoing citizen science projects, opportunities for them to participate in Earth science research. Weather monitoring is a great way to connect students with NOAA. Students can report precipitation with mobile devices using the mPING app, and schools can sign up to join the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS)offsite link. If you are near a waterway, use the Marine Debris Toolkit for Educators to engage your students in research on global plastic pollution.

Educate young learners
NOAA can help you teach even the youngest students. Look through our elementary resource collection for lessons on earth, life, and physical science, as well as careers and the scientific process. Check out our partnerships with the Octonautsoffsite link: listen to our podcast about the show’s featured animals and watch our video about life on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Find out more about weather and safety with Owlie Skywarn.

Decorate your classroom with posters and imagery
If your classroom is in need of an updated look, NOAA has you covered with high-resolution posters and images that you can download and print for free. For larger formats, check out these posters featuring the oceanoffsite linkweather, and climate. Bookmark the NOAA Satellite Image of the Day gallery for new ways to see the Earth. Scroll through the thousands of images in the NOAA Flickr library, all in the public domain.

— Source and photos: NOAA

 

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