CSAF delivers powerful message in new Air Force commercial

By Master Sgt. Chance Babin, Air Force Recruiting Service Public Affairs

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) — Air Force Chief of Staff General CQ Brown, Jr. delivers a powerful message about air power and diversity in a new Air Force commercial titled “Helmet.”

The dynamic 30-second spot aired for the first time on national TV during the NBA Finals pregame.

“I was a captain when I was asked to do an interview about diversity, and I shared this idea,” Brown said. “I want our adversaries to know that, no matter our respective backgrounds, our Airmen are unstoppable.”

For Air Force Recruiting Service’s top recruiter, the commercial is a slam dunk.

“The message is clear,” said Maj. Gen. Edward Thomas, AFRS commander. “As Airmen, we’re committed to ensuring we have the most capable and lethal air power in the world, and we want America’s best – the best from all of America – to come join us.”

Thomas emphasized that the Air Force is a warfighting organization, and the nation expects nothing less than the highest standards and a selection process that brings in the best Americans to become Airmen.

“When Gen. Brown became the CSAF, he clearly stated that the Air Force was going to  focus on what we do best – air power,” said Barry Dickey, AFRS director of strategic marketing. “We wanted to make a commercial that reinforced that priority, but also inspired Americans from all walks of life to serve in the Air Force.

“The power of this spot is in the underlying message and delivery. When I watch the commercial, I’m left with the understanding that the Air Force doesn’t care what you look like or where you come from,” Dickey said. “If you can do the job, we’ve got an opportunity for you. At the same time, I also get the message that the Air Force is about winning with air power, period. All of this is delivered by the leader of the Air Force in 30 seconds.”

AFRS and its advertising agency, GSD&M, originally planned to film two commercials with Brown at Edwards Air Force Base, California, with a focus on both diversity and air power.

The “Helmet” commercial was not in the original plans, but materialized as the day’s shooting progressed.

“While we were recording the voice-over for the commercials, Gen. Brown told a few stories and basically said what you hear in the commercial,” Dickey said. “When he did, I think everyone in the room immediately had the same thought – ‘we’ve got to record that!’ The creatives from GSD&M quickly turned his words into a script while we were filming and General Brown graciously agreed to perform on-camera.”

The commercial also fits squarely into AFRS Detachment 1’s efforts to reach into traditionally underserved communities to let people know about the opportunities to fly in the Air Force through programs designed to meet CSAF’s Rated Diversity Improvement initiative goals. For example, the Aim High Flight Academy gives disadvantaged youth a chance to learn to fly while being mentored by Air Force officers.

“We have a very healthy level of diversity in our enlisted ranks, but our officer and flying specialties look less like America,” Thomas said. “Air Force recruiting efforts have ramped up to better attract a cross-section of highly-qualified Americans into our ranks and specifically to consider flying opportunities.”

Source and photosUnited States Air Force (USAF)


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Drones May Be Here to Stay. Here’s What They Mean for Our Future

Drone technology has grown tremendously over the years. Here’s how the industry is growing in the D.C. area

By Michelai Graham

WASHINGTON—When I think of drones, I think about all the fun possibilities of playing with them. Could I just have a drone follow me around all day? Wouldn’t a drone race be cool? How fast can they really go?

But drone usage goes far beyond playtime. Technologically speaking, a drone is an unmanned aircraft that can be remotely controlled or fly autonomously via internal software-based sensors and GPS. Drones are transforming commercial industries, being used in military operations, helping first responders locate damage and people during disasters and becoming a fun hobby for people in general.

(AUVSI) reports there will be more than 100,000 jobs in unmanned aircraft and drone technology by 2025.

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) reported that there will be more than 100,000 jobs in unmanned aircraft and drone technology by 2025. The Arlington, Virginia-based association also reported that the drone industry will have an economic impact of more than $13.6 billion. Right now, Virginia is ranked in the top eight states predicted to see the most gains in terms of job creation and additional revenue form the drone technology industry, with California ranking as number one.

Drones and RoboticsGettyImages

Drone technology is being used all around the world in various industries from logistics to filmmaking, law enforcement, real estate and more. Here’s how the drone industry is growing in the D.C. area.

Drone Technology Advancements in DC

Last October, The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ruled that people can operate drones for commercial and government use if they weight 55 pounds or less. Some of the operating requirements include keeping your drone in sight, avoiding manned aircrafts, operating one drone at a time, and avoiding flying drones over people unless they are directly participating in an operation. Check out this fact sheet for FAA’s small unmanned aircraft systems regulations.

To even fly drones in the area, you must obtain a Remote Pilot Certificate from the FAA. Drone pilots must be 16 years old, be in good physical and mental health, be able to understand English, and above all, pass the aeronautical knowledge exam. Maryland also offers some other drone schooling programs.

One of the most successful uses of drone technology in D.C. is how the Environmental Protection Agency is using it to manage livestock and survey crops. In the future, the agency is hoping to help farmers use drones to spray crops.

If you’re looking to fly your drone commercially in the D.C. area, Virginia and Maryland have drone lawns, which are designated airspaces for drone activity. Make sure you know where you can and can’t fly in the D.C. area airspace.

Whether using drones for aerial photography, surveillance, or mapping, there is a plethora of companies in the D.C. area advancing drone technology. Here are 10 drone companies one may want to know about.

It’s important to note that drone flight across the National Capital Region (NCR) is governed by a Special Flight Rules Area, which prohibits unmanned aircrafts from operating within 15 miles of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport without FAA authorization.


Michelai Graham is the Washington, D.C. Bureau Senior Editor for bdpatoday.

Michelai Graham is the Washington, D.C. Bureau Senior Editor for bdpatoday.

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