Exascale Day with BDPA!

It’s October 18th 2021.  Happy Exascale day!

WASHINGTON—As we enter a new era in research and development (R&D) or modeling and simulation, exascale computing will rapidly transform our abilities to do just about anything with any connected or remote device on, in, or near our planet. 

Exascale systems and supercomputers are able to achieve over 1 quintillion operations per second. That’s 10 to the 18th power (10^18), or a “1” followed by 18 zeros. On National Exascale Day,  National BDPA, local BDPA Chapters, bdpatoday, and PTTV  celebrate  our 10th month on its 18th day.

Our Exascale Era will have very profound impacts on all industry market segments from energy, health,  manufacturing, logistics, and supply chain management to all modes of transportation, infrastructure, new technologies and policy.

So how will these advanced technologies all work together with our village and in your ‘hood?  How could more data from satellites, sensors, devices, and people, really work well atop newly secured platforms with compute at the edge in our new era?  

To view what a few Industry insiders have to say, visit our Exascale Day playlist and check out https://www.000000000000000000.com/ from HPE, one of National BDPA’s mission partners and longtime High School Computer Competition (HSCC) coding sponsor.

Sources: HPE and bdpatoday


A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The Hidden Figure$ of Gaming, Data Processing, and Code

SILICON VALLEY, CA—An early computer hobbyist’s club in Southern California has some pretty heady history behind it. You’d be hard pressed to match the geek cred of some of its members — Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, for example — and Jerry Lawson.

jerry-lawon_game-cartridge-creatorThe late Gerald Anderson Lawson (above), known as Jerry, along with Ron Jones, were the only two members of color of the Homebrew Computer Club in Silicon Valley.

The club began in 1975, the same year National BDPA was founded,  when hobbyists, most with an electronic engineering or computer programming background, met to talk about the Altair 8800 and to exchange schematics and programming tips. The Brooklyn, N.Y.-born electronic engineer, taught himself everything he knew about designing. His impressive creation of the Fairchild Channel F video game console separated him from contemporaries such as Nolan Bushnell and Ralph Baer.

The Fairchild Channel F console was released by Fairchild Semiconductor in November 1976 and was the first programmable ROM cartridge-based video game console, as well as the first console to use a microprocessor. Baer wrote the code for the first video game played on a TV set, called Chase, and in 1972 Bushnell helped create the video game Pong and later that year started Atari Computers.

But it was Lawson’s main distinction as the inventor of the video game cartridge, something that seems simple now, that established our new  standard for how video games were played into the next three decades.

marc-hannahChicago native Marc Regis Hannah (left) is a co-founder of Silicon Graphics (SGI) and is partly responsible for the direction of computer graphics since the company’s 1982 founding in Mountain View, CA. SGI partnered with Nintendo to create the early architecture of the Nintendo 64 gaming system. SGI, in essence, placed the power of a $5,000+ SGI Indy workstation into a $250 toy.  SGI’s technologies were used to design cars, aircraft, and  virtual simulation training for the Defense Department.

sgi-indySGI’s high-powered workstations were responsible for “computerized” films, such as “Mars Attacks!” and “Jurassic Park”.  Hannah’s 16 years at SGI made him a special effects whiz.  Hannah also is the recipient of 13 patents and numerous awards and honors, including the Professional Achievement Award from both Illinois Institute of Technology and the National Technical Association (NTA).

— Sources: Kevin L. Clark, techtimes.com
Photo credits: Estate of Jerry Lawson,
Black American History, and SGI

 

More Hidden Figures Unveiled at CES


LAS VEGAS, NV—BDPA Members and BDPA Student Members attended a CES SuperSession during #CES2017 co-hosted by IBM and the Consumer Technology Association (CTA).

The Power of Hidden Figures: Diversity in STEM” SuperSession was moderated by award-winning journalist, Soledad O’Brien. The SuperSession’s panel discussion with Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer and Director Theodore Melfi from the movie “Hidden Figures” was held during #CES2017 in the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 6, 2017, during the same day of their film’s release.

Octavia Spencer’s role in “Hidden Figures” is Ms. Dorothy Vaughan who selflessly helped other women gain footholds in the male-dominated space program at NASA and data processing fields.

Advocacy begins with you,
the individual…

– Octavia Spencer, Oscar-winning Actress

This special SuperSession’s distinguished panelists included: IBM Chief Diversity Officer Lindsay-Rae McIntyre; “Hidden Figures” Director Theodore Melfi; Oscar-winning Actress Octavia Spencer; Leah Gilliam, Vice President, Girls Who Code; Elizabeth Gabler, President, Fox 2000 Pictures; Rashid Ferrod Davis, Founding Principal of Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH); and Kristen Summers, IBM Watson Public Sector.

Visit IBM’s landing page to view CES’ SuperSession:
http://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/hidden-figures/

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